The world we live in is in a constant state of change. A 2014 study hinges on that axiom, attempting to quantify the accelerating rate of said change in a business/enterprise capacity by looking at the entry and exit of U.S. corporations in the S&P 500 index. “In 1958, corporations listed in the S&P 500 …

Dishing out Asset Light IT Strategies


I have to commend Ahead, Experts in Enterprise Cloud, and based in Chicago for the AWS courses they are conducting and dishing out. And I do mean dishing out. I attended last weeks presentation at Gibson’s Steakhouse in Oak Brook and aside from the rich lab content on IaaS, virtual cloud (VPC), Storage (S3), and Cloud Compute (EC2) that only an IT connoisseur can appreciate, the lunch included portions of Gibson’s famous prime rib. Well done Bryan and Jaime.

 

While large enterprises (Netflix, Siemens, GoDaddy, etc. ) understand fully the benefits of an asset light IT strategy that the AWS pay-as-you-use business model offers… the barriers for mid-to-small enterprise organizations on making the leap still exist. These barriers manifest themselves in…fear of change or losing IT control, lack of competitive urgency, redesigning and re-learning IT frameworks, indifference to lower-cost advantages…and others. With MS Azure giving AWS a run for its money, this increased competition adds to the complexity of weighing an outsource strategy. Nevertheless, these asset light strategies offer excellent opportunities for instructors, SME’s, and IT consultants to drive the message on game-changing reduced CAPEX/OPEX that brings music to the ears that only C-Levels can appreciate.

Samsung took the wraps off its new Infinity Flex Display device this morning, the first foldable hybrid gadget from the company that transforms from a phone into a tablet. Samsung says it plans to go into mass production for just the display in the “matter of months,” but we don’t really know much of anything about it beyond the brief glimpse we got onstage today. It’s a total mystery what it will cost, and we know very little about how the software will really function and just how many different display orientations it supports.

At a session this afternoon at its developer conference, Samsung did reveal some new information about the planned device, including pixel density, screen size, and aspect ratio in both the folded and unfolded modes, as reported by CNET’s Shara Tibken:

Pixel density is a standard 420 ppi, which is not the highest out there, but perfectly fine. Resolution when folded is 840 x 1960, but 1536 x 2152 when unfolded. The aspect ratios, however, are the more interesting specs here. The folded, phone version of the Infinity Flex has a 4.58-inch display with an aspect ratio of 21:9, which would make it pretty much the tallest device on the market and probably not the greatest screen for game-playing, video viewing, or anything like that. The unfolded, tablet version is clearly the primary mode for those types of activities, as it has a more standard 4.2:3 aspect ratio and a screen size of 7.3 inches.

There’s still a lot we don’t know about how this device is going to work, and how many iterations it might take for Samsung and other phone makers to really nail this form factor. (My guess is it will take a lot.) Thankfully, Google announced Android support for “foldables,” as we’re calling them, earlier this morning in conjunction with Samsung’s big reveal, so the initial software support is already there and it will only continue to get more robust over time.

In fact, news aggregation app Flipboard has already signed on to develop a special version of its app that modifies itself depending on which mode the Infinity Flex is running in:

Flipboard certainly won’t be the only developer to sign on. Considering Samsung is launching a new, three-app multitasking feature it’s calling Multi Active Window, it’s likely at least some other big-name developers will jump at the chance to create responsive and modular versions of their mobile apps to be among first to capitalize on the foldable trend.

JP Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon says he doesn’t “really give a shit” about bitcoin, his latest harsh comment on the popular cryptocurrency. Dimon spoke out about bitcoin yesterday at an Axios conference, after keeping silent for a period of time following an apology for calling bitcoin a “fraud.”

Last September, Dimon called out bitcoin in searing comments, added that, “It won’t end well. Someone will get killed.” But by January, he had backpedalled, saying that he regretted his comments and acknowledging that “the blockchain is real” technology. He kept quiet about the subject until August, when he again declared bitcoin was “a scam.”

Despite the CEO’s negative outlook on bitcoin, JP Morgan is still investing time and money into related technology. The company announced last week that it had built a blockchain platform called Quorum, based on Ethereum, for enterprise customers. The company proposes to offer digital tokens backed by gold bars and diamonds on the platform.

The conflict between cryptocurrency traders and traditional banks and financial figures like JP Morgan and Warren Buffett has been ongoing. Dimon’s comments encapsulate how the relationship is still sour, as traditional banking institutions tend to be wary of how financially volatile cryptocurrency is and, if blockchain ever achieves its goals, the decentralized financial structures that it could create. Bitcoin has lost a bit of its shine since prices hit an all-time high of over $20,000 earlier this year.

Dimon’s comments also happen to coincide with Bitcoin’s tenth anniversary. On this day 10 years ago, someone or a collective of people going by the name Satoshi Nakamoto published the bitcoin whitepaper, detailing a new “peer-to-peer” electronic cash system. Since then, bitcoin’s rising popularity has spawned many other cryptocurrencies, including Ethereum, Litecoin, and Monero.